Kony 2012
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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 12:05 PM EST
Regardless of what Invisibile Children does or does not do, Joseph Kony has been indicted by an International Criminal Court for his war crimes and crimes against humanity.

I've thought on and off about going into international law after a few years on the police force to offer my hand at helping people. There is enough evidence to support his trial.

I.C. has brought something to the attention of the less knowledable masses, knowledge is power.


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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 02:38 PM EST
It's good to see there are SOME decent minded people still out there.

I posted this on two other forums (a gun forum, and a corvette forum) and got a more positive response from a handful of rednecks... I should have expected this from MKO I guess. Gaming nerds will just be that; gaming nerds.

Espio872 Wrote:
Regardless of what Invisibile Children does or does not do, Joseph Kony has been indicted by an International Criminal Court for his war crimes and crimes against humanity.

I've thought on and off about going into international law after a few years on the police force to offer my hand at helping people. There is enough evidence to support his trial.

I.C. has brought something to the attention of the less knowledable masses, knowledge is power.




Reminds me of MK3's "There is no knowledge that is not power."

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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 03:04 PM EST
If Kony is caught and killed ( Then not showing any proof thats he's really dead *cough* bin laden *cough* ) One or More of his child soldiers would take his place!

And they'd have to gun down thousands of his child soldiers just to try to catch him!
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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 05:46 PM EST
You know, people who bash other who really don't mind/care of this kind of issue isn't better than those who just say, "I don't feel like wasting 30 minutes on watching a video."

All these attacks on people are certainly not making this issue any better, so can people STOP bashing others whether their feelings/opinions differ than everyone else for this particular situation? Because right now, all I'm getting out of this is if people who don't really care about this are heartless individuals who seems to be wasting their times, and I prefer not being labeled like that since I stated where I'm standing on this.

Let people say what they want and let the mods take care of the childish behaviors because just calling others morons or random names becuase they somehow hurt your feelings or seems like they're heartless human beings is just steeping down to the level that the trolls hang around.
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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 05:56 PM EST
It would be nice if mature and civil dialogue carried over to the private messages you keep sending me.

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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 05:59 PM EST
Espio872 Wrote:
It would be nice if mature and civil dialogue carried over to the private messages you keep sending me.



And you say there's trolls pestering the thread... Keep lying and trolling, I can play this game until a mod finally has enough. And you just proved my point too.
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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 06:07 PM EST
I've contributed to the thread multiple times and yes I'm trolling because that's what I do on this forum....../sarcasm.

I actually posted useful information on the topic, which is more than I can say for some people. I'm not going to argue with you anymore, it's a waste of time. I'm not playing a game, I'm 21, not 2 . This thread is more important than that.



More importantly, For those who are curious, I suggest you all head over to the International Criminal Court website to check out Joseph Kony's indictment, Invisible children might be questionable, but a neutral party has evidence of his crimes.

I would post a link but my computer's acting up.
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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 06:10 PM EST
This whole Kony 2012 thing is pointless.


Get that ass BANNED

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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 06:14 PM EST
*Ignoring measly comeback*

How do we know that if he does get caught and arrested, punished for his crimes, someone else wouldn't step up and take his place and do it all over again?

I've heard from people at a restaurant talking about this, whether or not it's true... Now, I'm going to state this now before you all shun this down. I did not say this, I heard people say this around me because this guy is coming up in people's conversations lately, and since we have negotiations of trades and such from Africa, I heard that if this guy is caught, we pay the price, but financially. How so?

According to what we use in our technology, such as TVs, cell phones and such, the diamonds that we use in there are the ones that come from Africa... And, the guy has children mining in Africa... And apparently we have some sort of cheap nagotiations about the diamond trade back and forth.

Just like the oil from Iran... But since there's talk about going after them, AGAIN, is the reason why we're going after Iran.

Going back, since this wasn't heard just once, I heard this from multiple people on this situation... If Kony is caught, doesn't this effect us price wise on a lot of things since we use the things they're mining? Granted that we're getting diamonds in a horrible way, I DID see a point they're trying to come across, and it is a bad one in our case if this is actually true.

I'm throwing this in here, becuase as I stated, I heard this on multiple times when this guy's name came across. And if this is a repeated conversation, that means that something is up.
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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 06:17 PM EST
Yes what Kony is doing is wrong, but are we honestly going to sit here and insult each other with childish and smart ass remarks, just because everyone has different opinions???


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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 06:23 PM EST
Darkhound74 Wrote:
Yes what Kony is doing is wrong, but are we honestly going to sit here and insult each other with childish and smart ass remarks, just because everyone has different opinions???


Yes, because apparently we gamers don't know the difference between the gaming world and the world that's outside our houses, and talking about a serious situation brings out the children in us. Yes, that's the reason.
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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 06:24 PM EST
I'd like this coverage to continue onward, more discussions about human rights abuses in mainstream media, anything to galvanize the people to move on these issues, Kony isn't the only tyrant who has been sitting pretty for years

There needs to be consistent updates and converage for people to stay involved as everyone cannot go to Africa, South America, or Asia,but there are ways to help, Human Rights Watch is really involved in these areas and often posts useful and lengthy publications on said topics, if anybody is curious about learning more, please refer yourself to these various websites, an informed populace is a safe and prosperous one.


blacksaibot Wrote:

Reminds me of MK3's "There is no knowledge that is not power."


lol winningglasses
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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 06:45 PM EST

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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 07:40 PM EST
Icebaby Wrote:
*Ignoring measly comeback*


Generally if you ignore something, you make no mention of it.

I'm well aware that IC has been called into question on some of their practices and the like, but there was actually a very well-written article addressing said claims. Take that for what you will.

Other charities may be more worth the donation. Other charities may also help Africans in need. IC is the only one directly dealing with the problem at hand, so if I do decide to kick in a few bucks, it's going to IC.

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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 08:36 PM EST
On a lighter note the whole thing has been a social experiment on people power but I also think it has unintentionally been a social experiment on how easily persuaded people are to joining a cause or how social media can make people believe they are all of a sudden experts at world issues.

Example I posted on my facbook a status saying "So people only just found out about the LRA?" I wrote this because I did some project on them in high school where I need to research a group of my choosing whether they be terrorist or army etc and googled child soldier and the LRA came up first. So I just assumed it was a much more known about issue.

However certain friends took issue with this statement. So I'll list a few replies I got. Keep in mind not once did I mention my standing on the issue.
"So what you think your better because you already know'
'I'm sick of people like you being so negative, look at the bigger picture'
'Is LRA the Kony thing?'

I replied with pretty much what I've wrote previously about their being no easy solution etc and got back.
"What so you think just cos you done some study your an expert, look at the bigger picture if you're not going to support it 100% don't talk about it'

I found that funny how this person had only just watched this video, 2 doesn't realise the bigger picture and finally is so spurred on by this that she thinks she can take away my right to an opinion.

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RE: Kony 2012
03/10/2012 11:50 PM EST
Regardlees of Invisible Children's percieved credibility, this is still a major Human rights issue. Just because we aren't in Africa to help directly, doesn't mean there's nothing we can do. Just discussing this issue brings it to the light of people who otherwise would't even know it was happening.

Oh my, well this has been going on for 20+ years...

Then by all means let's just let this shit continue...

This isn't a World Vision/needy kids commercial you can change the channel to avoid.

The squeaky wheel gets the grease? It's the cries of 30,000 children.
This MAN has killed enough kids to count for an entire small country/large city.

[Abhijit] [Ma'at] [Urcuchillay] [Zhi Nu] "Circling Vulture, Laughing Hyena"

True story, it happened to a friend of a friend of mine... EVERYBODY!

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RE: Kony 2012
03/13/2012 03:14 PM EDT
This is hilarious. Some of y'all are gonna love this. Don't worry this video is Only 4 minutes long.

NewAFTvid

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RE: Kony 2012
03/16/2012 05:32 PM EDT

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RE: Kony 2012
03/16/2012 05:59 PM EDT
Thank you for your meritorious contribution colt1107.

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RE: Kony 2012
03/16/2012 06:27 PM EDT
I've not gotten involved with the whole Kony thing because I know it's too easy to think one can do something about a problem without grasping the full scope of it if they're not involved from the beginning. I've yet to watch the 30-minute "documentary" but I've seen enough criticism about it to know that it's impossible to condense an issue that size into 30 minutes.
Speaking of the video, Ugandans themselves react negatively to it. Check out the flip side of the whole Kony campaign from the mouths of the people it affected directly.
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RE: Kony 2012
03/16/2012 07:08 PM EDT
blacksaibot Wrote:
Thank you for your meritorious contribution colt1107.


I'm guessing that's a smartass sarcastic statement. Listen I do believe Kony needs brought to justice. But I have to see all view points before I can make a judgement on how it needs to be done. Giving money to Joseph Russell's foundation is not the way to go about it. Only 33% of the money contributes to the foundations cause. Doesn't seem like quite enough to me. I'm just giving everyone an opportunity to look at both sides of the Coin. Yeah the video brought a sad situation to light. Great. But is sending our military in to find a warlord in hiding a situation the US needs to be in? Probably not. Is supporting a guy accused of public masturbation, which could get him classified as a sex offender by the way, the right way to go about it? Joseph Russells was a shady character to begin with. Just wait a month and I bet more skeletons come out of the closet.

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RE: Kony 2012
03/16/2012 08:07 PM EDT
what a strange turn of events
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RE: Kony 2012
03/17/2012 10:17 AM EDT
You have far worse enemies and far greater threats to freedom, much closer than you could ever imagine.

This is nothing. Although I do feel for the innocent people caught in this dilemna.

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RE: Kony 2012
03/17/2012 03:00 PM EDT
I'll probably throw in my own 2 cents soon enough, but for now, these three articles sum up a few points of contention decently:

Project Diaspora Wrote:
Cofounder / Senior Project Manager, UMPG
TMS Ruge was born in Masindi, Uganda and grew up in Uganda, Kenya and the US. Capitalizing on his understanding of different cultures and markets, Ruge has become a successful global social entrepreneur.

Through Project Diaspora—an organization he co-founded in 2007 to motivate, engage and mobilize the African Diaspora to take an active role in Africa’s development—he runs an indigenous farmers’ business (UMPG) in Masindi and advises a women’s jewelry making co-operative (Women of Kireka) in Kampala.

A technology enthusiast, Ruge has written and spoken extensively on the need to invest in Africa’s ICT sector. Ruge also runs a photography and web design business. He graduated with a Bachelors in Communication Design from the University of North Texas.




A Peace of my mind: Respect my agency 2012!

by TMS Ruge



I have had roughly 24 hours to gather my thoughts about the latest fund-raising stunt undertaken by the long-in-the-tooth Invisible Children (IC) organization. In that time, I have had an opportunity to think and ruminate over exactly what to say, what the right order of the words should be coming out of my soul to address yet another travesty in shepherd’s clothing befalling my country and my continent. Usually I would fly off the handle and let passion fly, but I have grown a little since this and this and this. Addressing the complexity that is Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA)’s reign of terror in northern Uganda; what with the sheer volume of victims, the survivors, the horrific examples of humanity at its worst, and the lingering ghosts of family members behind the survivors’ eyes begs a momentary pause, if but to respect the gravity of it all. I do that. I pause. I reflect and I toil with the thought that something is not right in the world that IC is still grasping at relevancy all these years after their “night walkers” campaign.

There is no easy way of saying what I feel right now, except a deep hurt and gnawing urgency to bang my head against my desk as a prescriptive to make the dumb-assery stop. Sure, Joseph Kony and his counterpart of yesteryear, Idi Amin, have largely been responsible for the single story of Uganda. I have a hard time shaking it from the lips of strangers I meet. That’s all they know or seem to want to listen to. They dismissively glaze over my breathless exultations of the great promise in our youth, our technology, our agriculture, and our women.

“Sooo, Idi Amin, huh? That was terrible. Is he still alive?”

It is a slap in the face to so many of us who want to rise from the ashes of our tumultuous past and the noose of benevolent, paternalistic, aid-driven development memes. We, Africans, are sandwiched between our historically factual imperfections and well-intentioned, road-to-hell-building-do-gooders. It is a suffocating state of existence. To be properly heard, we must ride the coattails of self-righteous idiocy train. Even then, we have to fight for our voices to be respected.

The latest IC fund-raising cum “awareness-raising” is an insult to my identity and my intellectual capacity to reasonably defend its existence as beneficial to any Ugandan. The video project is so devoid of nuance, utility and respect for agency that it is appallingly hard to contextualize. I won’t even try. Katrin Skaya said all that could have been said, “rarely seen something this stunningly, insidiously, clever crazy. Amazing case study.”

@tmsruge @texasinafrica @lksriv. Have rarely seen something this stunningly, insidiously, clever crazy. Amazing case study. #Kony2012

— Elasti Girl (@Katrinskaya) March 7, 2012

Indeed it is. But not for the reasons you would think. This IC campaign is a perfect example of how fund-sucking NGO’s survive. “Raising awareness” (as vapid an exercise as it is) on the level that IC does, costs money. Loads and loads of money. Someone has to pay for the executive staff, fancy offices, and well, that 30-minute grand-savior, self-crowning exercise in ego stroking—in HD—wasn’t free. In all this kerfuffle, I am afraid everyone is missing the true aim of IC’s brilliant marketing strategy. They are not selling justice, democracy, or restoration of anyone’s dignity. This is a self-aware machine that must continually find a reason to be relevant. They are, in actuality, selling themselves as the issue, as the subject, as the panacea for everything that ails me as the agency-devoid African. All I have to do is show up in my broken English, look pathetic and wanting. You, my dear social media savvy click-activist, will shed a tear, exhaust Facebook’s like button, mobilize your cadre of equally ill-uninformed netizens to throw money at the problem.

Cause, you know, that works so well in the first world.

I would love nothing more than to be telling you the small victories we experience working with the very scarred survivors of Kony’s atrocities. The Women of Kireka are the most resilient group of individuals that I know. Spend a day with them and you will wonder how they manage to so calmly describe to you watching their entire families burned alive, their husbands and children hacked to death, in front of them. They do it so calmly, methodically, with such articulate prose that it leaves your soul victimized for it’s privilege. Yet they don’t pause from rolling a perfectly crafted paper bead for a beautiful necklace. They don’t waste their time lamenting the lack of justice for the fallen or the abducted. Why? Because it doesn’t bring back the dead, it doesn’t dissolve the horrific images of their huts burning, or ease the scars borne of running scared into the night.

Instead, they want work and respect and business to be able to make decisions that move their lives along. They want desperately to forget and rebuild anew; thankful for their lives. They want radios and cell phones and grasp at any semblance of normalcy. They cuddle and nurse their newborns like delicate, cherished gifts. What they don’t talk about is justice. They talk about how to forgive and move on.

But I can’t tell you their story. Why? Someone else has taken over their part in this complex saga, simplified it, branded it, packaged it and is reselling it as an Action Kit. For as little as $30 and up to $500, you get your very own pimplicious t-shirt (that was made somewhere other than Uganda or Africa) and various assortments of SWEDOW you won’t care about in a month. But hey! At least you did something!

The academics have weighed in on this debate here, and here, and here and will continue to do elsewhere in the coming days. The click-activists, denied context and nuance, have spewed their ignorance all over the comments section in self-righteous indignation for all the world to see. They have whipped out their wallets and bought their very own Super Hero activist action kits. They have bombarded their friend’s Facebook wall with ignominious updates.

“You must watch this! I already ordered my action kit!”

If we all start from the premise that Kony’s actions over the last 25 years in East and Central Africa are atrocious and he should be stopped, we would be cut of the same moral cloth. Evil is something that is easy to point out from afar. But if we conclude that any one individual/organization/group has the right to hijack the voice of so many in the name of good, then I have a common sense pill to sell you.

Let me be honest. Africa is not short of problems, epidemics and atrocities. But it is also true that it is not short of miracles, ingenuity, and a proclivity to surprise. We as Africans, especially the Diaspora, are waking to the idea that our agency has been hijacked for far too long by well-meaning Western do-gooders with a guilty conscious, sold on the idea that Africa’s ills are their responsibility. This particular affliction is called “white man’s burden” in some circles. Please don’t buy into this. Africa’s problems are our own. I asserted as much almost 5 years ago when I started Project Diaspora.

And so to you we send this solemn pledge. No longer are we satisfied with the status quo. No longer will we look to the West and the East for a saviour to come. We here claim our political struggles as our own; our short comings as our own; our unrest as our own; our dissidence as our own; our broken infrastructure as our own; our diseases as our own; our uneducated as our own; our corruption as our own; our unfed children as our own.

We have to be given due courtesy to at least try to develop capacities adequate enough to address our issues. We will never develop that capacity to do so if IC and others think selling Action Kits delivers utopia. It didn’t change our way of life when IC started, and it certainly isn’t going to change our reality when the clock expires on December 31st.

I am coherent enough to realize when someone is trying to genuinely do good. At the surface, there’s nothing wrong with that. There is something wrong with assuming that the people who you are trying to help 1) need help, 2) want your help, or 3) can’t help themselves. IC and this video assumes all the above. Before anyone says ‘why haven’t you done anything to stop Kony?’, may I point out that it took the world’s most sophisticated army over a decade and billions of dollars to catch Osama bin Laden. Kony has been on the run for 25+ years. On a continent 3 times the size of America. Catching & stopping him is not a priority of immediate concern. You know what is? Finding a bed net so that millions of kids don’t die every day from malaria. How many of you know that more Ugandans died in road accidents last year (2838) than have died in the past 3 years from LRA attacks in whole of central Africa(2400)? We’ve picked our battles and we chose to simply try to live. And the world should be helping us live on our own terms, by respecting our agency to choose which battles to put capacity towards.

I’ve never heard of Germans running NGOs in [the United States of] America to try and fix the economy or Swedish NGOs in America trying to fix the declining standard of living. Africa is our problem, we hereby respectfully request you let us handle our own matters. We will make mistakes here and there, sure. That is expected. But the trade-off of writing our own destiny far outweighs the self-assigned guilt the world assigned to us. If you really want to help, keep the guilt and charity in your backyard. Bring instead, respect, and the humility to let us determine our destiny.


Note: It should be clear to everyone that this man obviously doesn't speak for all Ugandans. Let's not miss the substance of what he wrote and get all huffy over that peccadillo.

http://visiblechildren.tumblr.com/ Wrote:


The group is in favour of direct military intervention, and their money supports the Ugandan government’s army and various other military forces. Here’s a photo of the founders of Invisible Children posing with weapons and personnel of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army. Both the Ugandan army and Sudan People’s Liberation Army are riddled with accusations of rape and looting, but Invisible Children defends them, arguing that the Ugandan army is “better equipped than that of any of the other affected countries”, although Kony is no longer active in Uganda and hasn’t been since 2006 by their own admission. These books each refer to the rape and sexual assault that are perennial issues with the UPDF, the military group Invisible Children is defending.

Still, the bulk of Invisible Children’s spending isn’t on supporting African militias, but on awareness and filmmaking. Which can be great, except that Foreign Affairs has claimed that Invisible Children (among others) “manipulates facts for strategic purposes, exaggerating the scale of LRA abductions and murders and emphasizing the LRA’s use of innocent children as soldiers, and portraying Kony — a brutal man, to be sure — as uniquely awful, a Kurtz-like embodiment of evil.” He’s certainly evil, but exaggeration and manipulation to capture the public eye is unproductive, unprofessional and dishonest.

As Chris Blattman, a political scientist at Yale, writes on the topic of IC’s programming, “There’s also something inherently misleading, naive, maybe even dangerous, about the idea of rescuing children or saving of Africa. [...] It hints uncomfortably of the White Man’s Burden. Worse, sometimes it does more than hint. The savior attitude is pervasive in advocacy, and it inevitably shapes programming. Usually misconceived programming.”

Still, Kony’s a bad guy, and he’s been around a while. Which is why the US has been involved in stopping him for years. U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) has sent multiple missions to capture or kill Kony over the years. And they’ve failed time and time again, each provoking a ferocious response and increased retaliative slaughter. The issue with taking out a man who uses a child army is that his bodyguards are children. Any effort to capture or kill him will almost certainly result in many children’s deaths, an impact that needs to be minimized as much as possible. Each attempt brings more retaliation. And yet Invisible Children supports military intervention. Kony has been involved in peace talks in the past, which have fallen through. But Invisible Children is now focusing on military intervention.

Military intervention may or may not be the right idea, but people supporting KONY 2012 probably don’t realize they’re supporting the Ugandan military who are themselves raping and looting away. If people know this and still support Invisible Children because they feel it’s the best solution based on their knowledge and research, I have no issue with that. But I don’t think most people are in that position, and that’s a problem.




http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2012/03/201231284336601364.html Wrote:

Kampala, Uganda - From Kampala, the Kony 2012 hysteria was easy to miss. I'm not on Facebook or Twitter. I don't watch YouTube and the Ugandan papers didn't pick up the story for several days. But what I could not avoid were the hundreds of emails from friends, colleagues, and students in the US about the video by Invisible Children and the massive online response to it.

I have not watched the video. As someone who has worked in northern Uganda and researched the war there for more than a decade, much of it with a local human rights organisation based in Gulu, the Invisible Children organisation and their videos have often left me infuriated - I remember the sleepless nights after I watched their "Rough Cut" film for the first time with a group of students, after which I tried to explain to the audience what was wrong with the film while on stage with one of the filmmakers.

My frustration with the group has largely reflected the concerns expressed so convincingly by those online critics who have been willing to bring the fury of Invisible Children's true believers down upon themselves in order to point out what is wrong with this group's approach: the warmongering, the narcissism, the commercialisation, the reductive and one-sided story they tell, their portrayal of Africans as helpless children in need of rescue by white Americans.

As a result of Invisible Children's irresponsible advocacy, civilians in Uganda and central Africa may have to pay a steep price in their own lives so that a lot of young Americans can feel good about themselves, and a few can make good money. This, of course, is sickening, and I think that Kony 2012 is a case of Invisible Children having finally gone too far. They are now facing a backlash from people of conscience who refuse to abandon their capacity to think for themselves.

But, as I said, I wouldn't have known about Kony 2012 if it hadn't been for the emails I've been receiving from the US. And that, I think, is telling. Kony 2012 and the debate around it are not about Uganda, but about America. Uganda is largely just the stage for a debate over the meaning of political activism in the US today. Likewise, in my view, the Kony 2012 campaign itself is basically irrelevant here in Uganda, and perhaps the best approach might be to just ignore it. This is for a couple reasons.

First, because Invisible Children's campaign is a symptom, not a cause. It is an excuse that the US government has gladly adopted in order to help justify the expansion of their military presence in central Africa. Invisible Children are "useful idiots", being used by those in the US government who seek to militarise Africa, to send more and more weapons and military aid, and to bolster the power of states who are US allies.

The hunt for Joseph Kony is the perfect excuse for this strategy - how often does the US government find millions of young Americans pleading that they intervene militarily in a place rich in oil and other resources? The US government would be pursuing this militarisation with or without Invisible Children - Kony 2012 just makes it a little easier. Therefore, it is the militarisation we need to worry about, not Invisible Children.

Second, because in northern Uganda, people's lives will be left untouched by this campaign, even if it were to achieve its stated objectives. This is not because all the problems have been resolved in the years since open fighting ended, but because the very serious problems people face today have little to do with Kony.
Inside Story - 'Kony 2012': The future of activism

The most significant problem people face is over land. Land speculators and so-called investors, many foreign, in collaboration with the Ugandan government and military, are grabbing the land of the Acholi people, land that the Acholi were forced from a decade ago, when the government herded them into internment camps.

Another serious problem is so-called "nodding disease" - a deadly illness that has broken out among thousands of children who had the bad luck to be born and grown in the camps, subsisting on relief aid. Indeed, the problems people face today are the legacy of the camps, where more than a million Acholi were forced to live, and die - for years - by their own government as part of a counterinsurgency that received essential support from the US government and from international aid agencies.

Which brings up the question that I am constantly asked in the US: "What can we do?", where "we" tends to mean relatively privileged US citizens. In response, I have a few proposals:

The first, perhaps not surprising from a professor, is to learn. The conflict in northern Uganda and central Africa is complicated, but not impossible to understand. For several years, I have taught an undergraduate class on the conflict, and although it takes some time and effort, the students end up being well informed and able to come to their own opinions about what can be done. (I am more than happy to share the syllabus with anyone interested!)

In terms of activism, the first step is to re-think the question: Instead of asking how the US can intervene in order to solve Africa's conflicts, we need to ask what we are already doing to cause those conflicts in the first place. How are we, as consumers, contributing to land grabbing and to the wars ravaging this region? How are we, as US citizens, allowing our government to militarise Africa in the name of the "War on Terror" and its effort to secure oil resources?

These are the questions that we who represent Kony 2012's target audience must ask ourselves, because we are indeed responsible for the conflict in northern Uganda - responsible for helping to cause and prolong it. It is not, however, our responsibility, as Invisible Children encourages us to believe, to try to end the conflict by sending in military force. In our desire to ameliorate suffering, we must not be complicit in making it worse.

Adam Branch is senior research fellow at the Makerere Institute of Social Research, Uganda, and assistant professor of political science at San Diego State University, US. He is the author of Displacing Human Rights: War and Intervention in Northern Uganda.





Click the links to the original articles for all the handy links I was too lazy to convert.
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RE: Kony 2012
03/17/2012 04:13 PM EDT
1. His arrest was hilarious (because of the cause).

2. While I feel for the victims, I'm with the Ugandans on the "I smell bullshit" side of things.

3. I think it's kind of like 9/11: keep using a tragedy to capitalize off of it. I hate it.

Since there's nothing of value I could do (I'm not buying a fucking t-shirt from those fraudulent folks), I can't continue my thoughts. It'd only anger me.
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